Alexander Pope

English poet and satirist (1688-1744)

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Be not the first by whom the new are tried, Nor yet the last to lay the old aside.Rate it:
A man should never be ashamed to own he has been wrong, which is but saying, that he is wiser today than he was yesterday.Rate it:
Men must be taught as if you taught them not, And things unknown proposed as things forgot.Rate it:
It is with narrow-souled people as with narrow necked bottles the less they have in them, the more noise they make in pouring it out.Rate it:
Our passions are like convulsion fits, which, though they make us stronger for a time, leave us the weaker ever after.Rate it:
A family is but too often a commonwealth of malignants.Rate it:
A person who is too nice an observer of the business of the crowd, like one who is too curious in observing the labor of bees, will often be stung for his curiosity.Rate it:
All nature is but art unknown to thee.Rate it:
Amusement is the happiness of those who cannot think.Rate it:
An honest man is the noblest work of God.Rate it:
And all who told it added something new, And all who heard it made enlargements too.Rate it:
At every trifle take offense, that always shows great pride or little sense.Rate it:
Be thou the first true merit to befriend, his praise is lost who stays till all commend.Rate it:
Blessed is he who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed.Rate it:
Blessed is the man who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed.Rate it:
But thousands die without or this or that, die, and endow a college, or a cat: To some, indeed, Heaven grants the happier fate, Tenrich a bastard, or a son they hate.Rate it:
Charm strikes the sight, but merit wins the soul.Rate it:
Fools admire, but men of sense approve.Rate it:
He who tells a lie is not sensible of how great a task he undertakes for he must be forced to invent twenty more to maintain that one.Rate it:
He who tells a lie is not sensible of how great a task he undertakes; for he must be forced to invent twenty more to maintain that one.Rate it:
Histories are more full of examples of the fidelity of dogs than of friends.Rate it:
Hither the heroes and nymphs resort,To taste awhile the pleasures of a courtIn various talk th'instuctive hours they past,Who gave the ball, or paid the visit lastOne speaks the glory of the British Queen,And one describes a charming Indian screenlA third interprets motions, looks and eyesAt every word a reputation dies.Rate it:
Honor and shame from no condition rise.
Act well your part: there all the honor lies.
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In every friend we lose a part of ourselves, and the best part.Rate it:
In words as fashions the same rule will hold,Alike fantastic if too new or oldBe not the first by whome the new are tried,Nor yet the last to lay the old aside.Rate it:
It is with our judgments as with our watches: no two go just alike, yet each believes his own.Rate it:
It is with our judgments as with our watches; no two go just alike, yet each believes his own.Rate it:
Know then thyself, presume not God to scan,The proper study of Mankind is Man.Rate it:
Let me tell you I am better acquainted with you for a long absence, as men are with themselves for a long affliction absence does but hold off a friend, to make one see him the truer.Rate it:
Like bubbles on the sea of matter borne, They rise, they break, and to that sea return.Rate it:
Love, free as air at sight of human ties, Spreads his light wings, and in a moment flies.Rate it:
Lulled in the countless chambers of the brain, our thoughts are linked by many a hidden chain; awake but one, and in, what myriads rise!Rate it:
One who is too wise an observer of the business of others, like one who is too curious in observing the labor of bees, will often be stung for his curiosity.Rate it:
Remembrance and reflection how allied. What thin partitions divides sense from thought.Rate it:
Some people will never learn anything, for this reason, because they understand everything too soon.Rate it:
The general cry is against ingratitude, but the complaint is misplaced, it should be against vanity; none but direct villains are capable of willful ingratitude; but almost everybody is capable of thinking he hath done more that another deserves, while the other thinks he hath received less than he deserves.Rate it:
There is a certain majesty in simplicity which is far above all the quaintness of wit.Rate it:
To err is human to forgive, divine.Rate it:
To err is human, to forgive is divine.Rate it:
To err is human; to forgive, divine.Rate it:
What will a child learn sooner than a song?Rate it:
Wit is the lowest form of humor.Rate it:
Words are like leaves and where they most abound, Much fruit of sense beneath is rarely found.Rate it:

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