Blaise Pascal used to mark with charcoal the walls of his playroom, seeking a means of making a circle perfectly round and a triangle whose sides and angle were all equal. He discovered these things for himself and then began to seek the relationship which existed between them. He did not know any mathematical terms and so he made up his own. Using these names he made axioms and finally developed perfect demonstrations, until he had come to the thirty-second proposition of Euclid.Rate it:(0.00 / 0 votes)Say it

C. M. Cox

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"C. M. Cox Quotes." Quotes.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2014. Web. 20 Oct. 2014. <http://www.quotes.net/quote/43956>.

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