Search results for attitude of health personnel

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Nan Hee KimRate it:

Cortney Brand said. Denver Basin Water is exploring the feasibility of pumping water far under the city, into the massive Denver Basin aquifer system to keep it there until the next dry spell. As Denver Water Resource Engineer Bob Peters points out, in the already arid American West, Drought is always on the horizon. We only get 15 inches of rainfall a year here in Denver Basin, and most of Denver Water comes from the mountain snowpack. That mountain snowpack melts and runs downstream, supplying water for much of the nation including the parched Southwest. When the snowpack fails the effects reach far beyond the region according to Doug Kenney, Director of the Western Water Policy Center at University of Colorado Law School. The California drought has really illustrated to people why drought in the West is important. If you consume vegetables in winter, you're probably getting those from Southern California, so from farm products to general economic health, not only do these things resonate throughout the rest of the country but throughout the rest of the world. A secondary source of water comes from underground aquifers which nature filled over the course of millions of years, and which humans are draining at a massive rate. Even though the aquifer system under the city of Denver Basin covers an area the size of the Connecticut, Peters said, The Denver Basin ground water is non-renewable so if you pump that water it's gone. What we're talking about is taking our renewable water supplies and injecting them into the aquifer to keep the aquifer replenished. With core samples taken every 10 feet down, the bore holes being drilled beneath Denver Basin will provide geologic data about how well the various open bowls in the rock will hold water without losing any to seepage or cracks. Cities like Phoenix, Wichita and San Antonio are already banking water underground and because it doesn't have the same downsides as above-ground reservoirs the method will surely become more common. Reservoirs are really tough to build, politically and financially, Kenney said.

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Dr. Gary Gibbons, director of the NIH's National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute said. Blood pressure is measured by two numbers : the systolic pressure and the diastolic pressure. The systolic pressure is the top number while the diastolic pressure is the bottom number. The current blood pressure guidelines suggest that the systolic pressure( the top number) should be around 150 to 160. This study recommends that doctors try to keep the systolic pressure should be under at least 120. This is especially true for people over age 50. High blood pressure key statistics : • About 70 million American adults have high blood pressure, meaning 1 in every 3 adults • Only about half of people with high blood pressure have their condition under control. • Nearly 1 out of every 3 American adults has pre-hypertension( when the blood pressure numbers are higher than normal, but not yet in the range of high blood pressure) • Women are about as likely as men to develop high blood pressure during their lifetimes. • However, for people who are younger than 45, high blood pressure affects more men than women. For people 65 or older, high blood pressure affects more women than men. The study involved more than 9,300 people who were aged 50 and older. The study participants were all at an increased risk for heart disease or kidney disease. Half of the participants received an average of two medications which were supposed to lower their systolic pressure below 140. The other half of the participants received an average of three medications to lower their systolic pressure below 120. The results showed that the participants who were able to get their systolic pressure below 120 had significant health benefits. Those who got their systolic pressure under 120 had a 25 percent lower risk of death. They also had a 30 percent lower risk of cardiovascular problems such as heart attack and stroke. This study provides potentially lifesaving information that will be useful to health care providers as they consider the best treatment options for some of their patients, particularly those over the age of 50.

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