Tin Cup

One of the better romantic comedies of the 1990s, this quirky love story stars Kevin Costner as washed-up golf pro Roy "Tin Cup" McAvoy, who has the singular misfortune of falling in love with the girlfriend (Rene Russo) of his arch rival (Don Johnson). Although he is inspired to re-ignite his golf career, challenge his opponent in the U.S. Open, and win the affection of the woman of his dreams, McAvoy has just one flaw: he's a show off when he should just focus on playing the game. Reunited with his Bull Durham writer-director Ron Shelton, Costner fits into his role like a favorite pair of shoes, and costar Cheech Marin scores a memorable scene-stealing comeback as McAvoy's best buddy, Romeo Posar. Mixing his love of sports with his flair for fresh, comedic dialogue, Shelton takes this enjoyable movie down unexpected detours (although some may find it a bit too long), and his characters are delightfully unpredictable. --Jeff Shannon

Genre: Comedy, Drama, Romance
Production: New Line Home Entertainment
  Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. Another 3 nominations.
 
IMDB:
6.3
Metacritic:
60
Rotten Tomatoes:
69%
R
Year:
1996
135
10,455 Views

Roy 'Tin Cup' McAvoy:
Okay, so how do I do it? Therapy, I mean, I mean, wh-- how do I start doing it?

Dr. Molly Griswold:
Ooo-kay, Roy. Well, in parlance you might understand, just kick back and let the big dog eat.

Roy 'Tin Cup' McAvoy:
Suppose there's this guy, and he's standing on the shore of a big wide river, and the... river's full of all manner of disaster, you know, piranhas, alligators, eddies, currents, shit like that... nobody'll even go down there to dip a toe. And on the other side of the river's a million bucks, and on this side of the river... is a rowboat.

Dr. Molly Griswold:
Mm-hmm?

Roy 'Tin Cup' McAvoy:
I guess my question's this: What would possess the guy standing on the shore to swim for it?

Dr. Molly Griswold:
He is an idiot.

Roy 'Tin Cup' McAvoy:
No, see, he's a helluva swimmer. His problem's more like why does he always have to... rise to the challenge?

Dr. Molly Griswold:
He is a juvenile idiot.

Roy 'Tin Cup' McAvoy:
You don't understand what I mean by the river.

Dr. Molly Griswold:
Roy, we're talking about you, and what you like to call your inner demons -- that human frailty you like to blather about -- not some mythopoetic metaphor you come up with in a... feeble and transparent effort to do yourself credit.

Roy 'Tin Cup' McAvoy:
You mean you're going to make me feel lousy?

Dr. Molly Griswold:
No.

Roy 'Tin Cup' McAvoy:
I came here to feel better. I mean, what kind of therapy is...

Dr. Molly Griswold:
Roy, Roy, Roy, you don't have any inner demons. What you have is inner crapola, inner debris... garbage... loose wires, a few...

Dr. Molly Griswold:
horseshit in staggering amounts.

Roy:
"What Is The Golf Swing," by Roy McAvoy? Well, I tend to think of the golf swing as a poem.

Romeo:
Ooh, he's doing that poetry thing again.

Roy:
The critical opening phrase of this poem will always be the grip. The hands unite to form a single unit by the simple overlap of the little finger.

Molly:
Right.

Roy:
Lowly and slowly, the clubhead is led back, pulled into position not by the hands, but by the body, which turns away from the target, shifting weight to the right side without shifting balance. Tempo is everything; perfection unobtainable as the body coils down at the top of the swing. There's a slight hesitation. A little nod to the gods...

Molly:
A, a nod to the gods?

Roy:
Yeah, to the gods. That he is fallible. That perfection is unobtainable. And now the weight begins shifting back to the left pulled by the powers inside the earth, it's alive, this swing! A living sculpture and down through contact, always down, striking the ball crisply, with character. A tuning fork goes off in your loins. Such a pure feeling is the well-struck golf shot. And then the follow through to finish. Always on line. The reverse C of the Golden Bear! The steel workers' power and brawn of Carl Sandburg's Arnold Palmer!

Romeo:
Ohh, he's doing that Arnold Palmer thing.

Roy:
And then the unfinished symphony of Roy McAvoy.

Molly:
What's unfinished?

Roy:
Well, I have a short follow-through. It has an unfinished look...

Molly:
Why?

Roy:
Well, some say it's the easiest way to play in the winds of west Texas...some say it's because I never finish anything in my life. You can decide. But the point is...every finishing position is unique. That's what the golf swing's about. It's about gaining control of your life and...letting go at the same time.

Molly:
Jeez Louise.

Roy:
There's only one other acceptable theory about how to hit the ball.

Molly:
Oh, boy, well, I'm afraid to ask. What is it?

Roy:
Grip it and rip it.

Share your thoughts on Tin Cup's quotes with the community:

0 Comments

    Quote of the Day Today's Quote | Archive

    Would you like us to send you a FREE inspiring quote delivered to your inbox daily?

    Please enter your email address:

    Citation

    Use the citation below to add this movie page to your bibliography:

    Style:MLAChicagoAPA

    "Tin Cup Quotes." Quotes.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2020. Web. 20 Oct. 2020. <https://www.quotes.net/movies/tin_cup_quotes_11675>.

    Know another quote from Tin Cup?

    Don't let people miss on a great quote from the "Tin Cup" movie - add it here!