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Lyndon B. JohnsonRate it:

Karl Rove, March 19, 2001Rate it:

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Robert SmithRate it:

Structurally they are betting the farm and everything possible to get through these midterms, and they are just opening up the checkbook to do it. ' Public investment shrinks as safety net balloonsWhatever the immediate political impact, if President Joe Biden ultimately signs anything like the proposed program, it would mark a new era in Washington's role in the economy.Over the past 50 years, federal spending, as a share of the nation's economic output, has averaged about 20.6 %, according to calculations by the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, a centrist group that argues for budgetary restraint. Washington has significantly exceeded that level only in times of crisis : Spending reached 24 % of the nation's gross domestic product during Obama's first term immediately after the 2008 financial crisis and roughly 32 % during the Covid pandemic, federal figures show. ( Federal spending as a share of the economy reached its modern high of more than 40 % at the height of World War II.) Though federal spending over the past half century has remained relatively constant at about one-fifth of the economy, the composition of that spending has shifted dramatically. Over that period, public investment -- defined primarily as federal spending on infrastructure, education and training, and support for research and development -- has declined, while the safety net -- including such payments to individuals as Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, food assistance and various tax credits for families -- has soared. Its totally different from anything put forward by Obama or Clinton. In terms of any kind of coherent strategic focus theres been nothing like this since the build-out of the suburbs, and the buildup of the educational system.Josh Bivens, research director, Economic Policy InstituteIn 1969, federal figures show, public investment and payments to individuals each consumed nearly one-third of total federal spending, an amount equal to about 6 % of the economy. By 2019, the last year before Washington poured huge sums into the Covid crisis, public investment had fallen to just 12.5 % of Responsible Federal Budget while payments to individuals had grown past 70 %. Public investment now equals only about 2.5 % of the economy, while payments to individuals consume more than five times as much.The exact distribution between public investment and safety net spending in the Democratic plans isn't known, because the party hasn't released details on the funding levels in the $ 3.5 trillion budget blueprint that Senate Democrats recently agreed on. But it's clear that the proposal -- coupled with the bipartisan infrastructure agreement advancing on a separate track -- would represent a huge expansion on both fronts.The infusion of new money for public investment might be most striking, given how steadily it has lost ground in federal priorities. Public investment fell from about 30 % of federal spending in the late 1960s to about 20 % by the late 1970s and 15 % by the mid-1990s, a plateau from which it's since drifted further down except for a brief recovery under Obama's first-term stimulus plan. The budget plans Senate Democrats are advancing would provide a more lasting turnaround. The bipartisan plan would spend almost $ 600 billion on.

David BergsteinRate it:

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Kamal HamdanRate it:

Well the most important thing we're going to do is to build a fair, level playing field for everybody, i welcome the debate. I think there is going to be a bumper crop of candidates and that the American people are going to see a very robust Democratic Party. What will unite all of them is that they are all fighting for a better deal and a brighter future and better tomorrows for everyone, not just a few at the top. And what we're doing at the DNC is making sure we build the infrastructure, the organizing infrastructure, the technology infrastructure so that whoever ... becomes the nominee that they can walk into a DNC that enables them to sprint across the finish line.Listen hereWhile Perez said he hopes ideas and ideals are what helps to unite his party, it may just be mutual disgust for Trump that will act as the super glue for Democrats.Below are some of excerpts of my interview with DNC Chairman Tom Perez. This QA has been edited for brevity, clarity and flow.Mark Preston: As you look at the current state of play right now, what is the Democratic plan to address Donald Trump in this off year?Tom Perez: Step one is that we have to take on Donald Trump in all of these areas that he's trying to take America back, and make America weak, not make America great. Equally important though, we can't simply be against Donald Trump. We've got to articulate what we are for, and we have always been fighting for a fair shake for everyone. Listen hereFollow CNN OpinionJoin us on Twitter and FacebookPreston: (W)hen you were running for chairman, ... it was a bit of a contentious fight. There was a lot of criticism from the grassroots about the battle between establishment Democrats and grassroots Democrats. ... What is being done behind the scenes to try to bridge the divide between those two (factions)?Perez: Every single day we are leading with our values. ... If we want to address income inequality in this country, one of the most important things we can do is support efforts for people to unionize and form a union. When unions succeed, the middle class succeeds. When unions succeed, income inequality goes down, and what we have to do as a party is be out there on the issues that matter the most to people: health care, good jobs, the efforts to cut support for public education, we have to articulate what we stand for.

Tom PerezRate it:

When Fidel Castro came into office, you know what he did? He had a massive literacy program. Is that a bad thing? Even though Fidel Castro did it? Sanders, a self-described democratic socialist, has refused to back down from his comments arguing during Tuesday nights debate in South Carolina that former President Barack Obama had once praised the Castro regimes progress on education and healthcare. The Vermont lawmaker said there is a reticence among Americans to look back at Washingtons own history of overthrowing foreign governments and supporting dictators. It might be a good idea to be honest of American foreign policy and that is the American government helped overthrow governments in Chile, Nicaragua, and Iran, Sanders said in reference to U.S. support in overthrowing leaders in those countries in the 1970s and 80s. Sanders reference to Obama did not sit well with former Vice President Joe Biden, who claimed that his boss never embraced an authoritarian regime, while former South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete Buttigieg lamented that the candidates were debating about Cold War-era policies. This is not about what coups happened in the 1970s and 80s, this is about the future, Buttigieg said. Sanders comments about the Castro regime could play a large role in how he fares in Floridas March 17 primary. Sanders socialist identification and his willingness to praise leftist regimes have given his Democratic opponents ammunition to question his electability in a state with a large Cuban American population that remains fiercely skeptical of leftist governments. In Florida, where Hispanics account for nearly one in every five voters, that skepticism could present a major hurdle for Sanders in the states primary, and for Democrats hoping to win Floridas 29 electoral votes in November. According to an Associated Press survey, about a third of Cuban American midterm voters identified as Democrats. However, Democrats hardly have a lock on that vote in battleground Florida, particularly among the nearly 2 million Floridians of Cuban, Venezuelan and Nicaraguan origin. In 2018, Republican Ron DeSantis narrowly won Floridas governors mansion. While more than two-fifths of Florida Latinos voters favored DeSantis overall, a clear majority of Cuban American voters 57 percent cast their support for the Republican. Critics say Sanders needs to more strongly disavow Cuba and other authoritarian regimes. Its not just about Cuban American voters, its Hispanic voters as well, many of whom would never consider voting for an avowed socialist ....

Fernand AmandiRate it:

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    Who said: "The art of leadership is saying no, not yes – it’s very easy to say yes.’"?
    • A. Mao Tse-Tung
    • B. Tony Blair
    • C. Franklin Delano Roosevelt
    • D. Donald Trump