Lolita

Lolita

With the 1957 release of Paths of Glory, Stanley Kubrick confirmed his early promise and joined the ranks of world-class filmmakers. The age of the auteur had arrived, and Kubrick was a prime candidate for inclusion in the pantheon of directors later canonized by critic Andrew Sarris in his influential book The American Cinema. Ironically, this was also the period during which Kubrick left his native soil for permanent residence in England, and from that point forward, the Kubrick mystique inflated to legendary proportions. But if Kubrick was no longer bringing himself to the world, he was certainly bringing the world to his films. From the comfort of his rural England estate and locations never far from London, Kubrick would command cinematic odysseys to isolated Colorado (in The Shining), battle-ravaged Vietnam (Full Metal Jacket), upscale New York City (Eyes Wide Shut), and, of course, Jupiter and Beyond the Infinite (in 2001: A Space Odyssey). The New Stanley Kubrick Collection includes all eight of Kubrick's films from Lolita on--a quarter-century of brilliant, challenging cinema. This second edition adds Eyes Wide Shut to the previous collection and remastered sound on five of the films plus a new anamorphic edition of 2001. Purists have complained that Kubrick's last three films have been released in full-screen format only; this was in compliance with Kubrick's wishes, and the films do not suffer unduly from full-screen formatting. This set also features a new full-length documentary made by longtime Kubrick assistant Jan Harlan, Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures. The diversity of Kubrick's work is truly astonishing, even though the director's technical precision and steely perspective on humanity may strike uninitiated viewers as cold and even misanthropic. His films almost always received mixed (and sometimes scathingly negative) reviews upon their release, only to benefit from glowing reassessment as they grew entrenched in the public consciousness. Here, in all their glory, are the collected films of a genuine master, ripe for study and appreciation for many years to come. --Jeff Shannon

Genre: Drama, Romance
Director(s): Stanley Kubrick
Production: MGM
  Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 2 wins & 8 nominations.
 
IMDB:
7.6
Rotten Tomatoes:
95%
NR (Not Rated)
Year:
1962
154
1,203 Views

Quilty:
[after Humbert ignores his ping pong serve] Roman ping...You're supposed to say Roman pong! OK, you serve. I don't mind. I don't - I just don't mind. Come on... [serves again] Roman ping-pong. Kinda tricky serve to handle, eh Captain? Kind of tricky. One of the champs taught me that. I'm not accusing you, Captain, but it's sort of absurd the way people invade this house without even knocking...They use the telephone..

Humbert:
You really don't remember me, do you?

Quilty:
Have you ever noticed how the ...different champs use their bats? You know, some of 'em hold it like this and everything.

Humbert:
Do you recall a girl called Dolores Haze?

Quilty:
I remember the one guy, he didn't have a hand. He had a bat instead of a hand. He's...

Humbert:
[Bangs on the table loudly with the paddle] Lolita?!

Quilty:
Lo-li-tah. Yeah, yeah. I remember that name, all right. Maybe she made some telephone calls. Who cares?

[Humbert draws a gun]

Quilty:
Hey, you're a sort of bad loser, Captain. I never found a guy who pulled a gun on me when he lost a game. Didn't anyone ever tell ya? It's not really who wins, it's how you play, like the champs. Listen, I don't think I want to play anymore. Gee, I'm just dyin' for a drink. I'm just dyin' to have a drinkie.

Humbert:
You're dying anyway, Quilty. Quilty, I want you to concentrate - you're going to die. Try to understand what is happening to you.

Quilty:
You are either Australian or a German refugee. This is a gentile's house - you'd better run along.

Humbert:
Think of what you did, Quilty, and think of what is happening to you now.

Quilty:
Hee-hee-hee...gee, that's a - that's a durl-in' little gun you got there. That's a durlin' little thing. How much a guy like you want for a-a durlin' little gun like that?

Humbert:
[thrusts out a note for him] Read this.

Quilty:
What's this, the deed to the ranch?

Humbert:
It's your death sentence. Read it.

Quilty:
I can't read, ah, mister. I never did none of that there book learnin', ya know.

Humbert:
Read it, Quilty!

Quilty:
Mmm? 'Because you took advantage of a sinner. Because you took advantage...Because you took...Because you took advantage of my disadvantage.' Gee, that's a dad-blasted durn good poem you done there. 'When I stood Adam-Naked...' Oh! Adam-Naked, you should be ashamed of yourself, Captain. '...before a Federal Law and all its stinging stars.' Tarnation, you old horned toad, that's a mighty pretty...that's a pretty poem. 'Because you took advantage' - Gee, it's getting a bit repetitious, isn't it - 'Because' - there's another one - 'Because you cheated me. Because you took her at an age, when young lads...'

Humbert:
[he snatches the note back] That's enough!

Quilty:
Say, what you take it away for, mister? That was getting kind of smutty there! [laughs]

Humbert:
Do you have any last words?

Quilty:
Listen, Mac. You're drunk, and I'm a sick man. This pistol-packing farce is becoming a sort of nuisance.

Humbert:
Do you want to die standing up or sitting down?

Quilty:
I wanna die like a champion.

[Humbert fires the gun]

Quilty:
Gee, right in the boxing glove. You want to be more careful with that thing. Listen Captain, why don't you stop trifling with life and death? I'm a playwright. You know, I know all about this sort of tragedy and comedy and fantasy and everything. I've got fifty-two successful scenarios to my credit, added to which my father's a policeman. [He turns to the piano] Listen, you look like a music lover to me. Why don't you let, why, why don't you let me play you a little thing I-I wrote last week? [He begins playing Chopin's Grand Polonaise] Nice sort of opening that, eh? We could dream up some lyrics, maybe. You and I dream them up together, you know, share the profits. Do you think that'll make the hit parade? [Singing] Uh, the moon was blue, and so are you and I tonight...she's mine...yours...she's...she's yours tonight...and...and... [runs from the room]

[Humbert chases him and fires again, hitting Quilty in the leg]

Quilty:
Gee! Gee, that hurt me, that... You really hurt me. Listen, if you're tryin' to scare me, you did a pretty swell job all right. My leg'll be black and blue tomorrow. You know, this house is roomy and cool. You see how cool it is. I intend moving to England or Florence forever. You can move in. I've got some nice friends, you know, who could come and keep you company here. You could use them as pieces of furniture. This one guy looks just like a bookcase. I could fix it up for you to attend executions, how would you like that? Just you there, nobody else, just watching. Watch! You like watching, Captain? No, cause, not many people know that the, ha-ha, that the chair is painted yellow. You'd be the only guy in the know.

Humbert shoots him again]

Quilty:
That hurts!

Quilty:
Hello, heh-heh, heh-heh. Hello.

Humbert:
Oh, you're addressing me?...I thought there was perhaps someone with you.

Quilty:
No, I'm not really with someone. I'm with you, heh-heh. I didn't mean that as an insult. What I really meant was that, uh, I'm with the State Police, uh, here, and, uh, when I'm with them, I'm with someone, but right now, I'm on my own. I mean, I'm not with a lot of people, just you. Heh.

Humbert:
Well, I wouldn't like to disturb you. I'll leave you alone if you prefer it.

Quilty:
No, you don't really have to go at all. I like it, you know, because, uh, I don't know what it is. I sort of get the impression that you want to leave but you don't like to leave because maybe you think I'd think it'd look suspicious, me being a policeman...You don't have to think that, because, uh, I haven't really got a suspicious mind at all. I look suspicious myself. A lot of people think I'm suspicious, especially when I stand around on street corners. One of our own boys picked me up the other week - he thought I was too suspicious standing on a street corner and everything. Tell me something, uhm, I couldn't help noticing when you checked in tonight. It's part of my job - I notice human individuals - and I noticed your face. I said to myself when I saw you - I said, 'That's a guy with the most normal-looking face I ever saw in my life'...It's great to see a normal face, because I'm a normal guy. It would be great for two normal guys like us to get together and talk about world events - you know, in a normal sort of way...May I say one other thing to you? It's really on my mind. I've been thinking about it quite a lot. I noticed when you was checking in, you had a lovely, pretty little girl with you. She was really lovely. As a matter of fact, she wasn't so little, come to think of it. She was fairly tall, what I mean, taller than little, you know what I mean. But, uh, she was really lovely. I wish I had a lovely, pretty tall, lovely little girl like that, I mean...Your daughter? Gee, isn't it great to have a lovely, tall, pretty little, small daughter like that, it's really wonderful. I don't have any children, boys or little tall girls or anything. I'm not even...Heh-heh, may I say something? I thought you was looking a little uneasy at the desk there. Maybe I was thinking that you want to get away from your wife for a little while. I don't blame you. If I was married, I'd take every opportunity to get away from my wife.

Humbert:
She had an accident.

Quilty:
That's really terrible. I mean, fancy a fella's wife having, a normal guy's wife having an accident like that. What happened to her?

Humbert:
She was hit by a car.

Quilty:
Gee, no wonder she's not here. Gee, you must feel pretty bad about that. What's happening? Is she coming on later or something?

Humbert:
Well, that was the understanding.

Quilty:
What? In an ambulance? Heh-heh. Gee, I'm sorry, I shouldn't say that. I get sorta carried away, you know, being so normal and everything. Tell me, umm, when you were standing there at the desk checkin' in with the night manager, Mr. George Swine, who I happen to know as a personal friend of mine, umm, I was wondering if, uh, he fixed you up with, uh, sort of good accommodation here...You're quite sure about that, because, I mean, I could really easily have a word with George Swine. Uh, I mean, he's a really nor-normal nice sorta guy and I've only got to have a normal word in his ear and you'd be surprised what things could happen from a thing like that. I mean, he-he'd probably go and turn some of the troopers out so you could have a lovely room - a bridal suite for you and your lovely little girl.

Humbert:
No, please, I don't want you to take any trouble on my account. We're perfectly comfortable.

Quilty:
But he should do it. It's his job to fix you up with something nice, I mean, you know, he gets paid for doing that thing and when he sees a guy like you coming in, all normal and everything, with a lovely little girl beside him, he should say to himself, 'Gee, I've got to give that guy a lovely sorta comfortable foamy bed to sleep in.' I mean, you know, I just don't like to hear things like that happening because I could go over and really take a swipe at him for not giving you a lovely, comfortable, sleepy, movie-star bed. You know what I mean, heh, I mean, you know, what has he got ya? On the floor or something?

Humbert:
Well, the little girl is probably asleep already - in the bed - and, uh... [laughs] I don't know why we're discussing this because...

Quilty:
Listen, why don't you let me have a look at the room - at the accommodation that you have, now, and-and-and- really take it in for a second - and then I could come down and have a word with George Swine? It would be so simple.

Humbert:
If you'll excuse me.

Quilty:
You're going because you maybe think that, uh, me being a policeman and everything, I think you're sorta suspicious. I-I don't think that at all. I think you're really normal and everything. You don't have to go because of that...You have a most interesting face. Goodnight.

Lolita:
You never let me have any fun.

Humbert:
No fun? You have all the fun in the world. We have fun together, don't we? Ay, whenever you want something, I buy it for you automatically. I take you to concerts, to museums, to movies. I do all the housework. Who does the-the tidying up? I do. Who does the cooking? I do. You and I have lots of fun - don't we Lolita?

Lolita:
[she smiles] Come here. [He kneels in front of her] Still love me?

Humbert:
Completely. You know that.

Lolita:
You know what I want more than anything else in the world?

Humbert:
What do you want?

Lolita:
I want you to be proud of me.

Humbert:
I am proud of you, Lolita.

Lolita:
No, I mean really proud of me. You see, they want me for the lead in the school play. Isn't that fantastic? And I have to have a letter from you, giving your permission.

Humbert:
Who wants you?

Lolita:
Well, Edusa Gold, the drama teacher, Clare Quilty, and Vivian Darkbloom.

Humbert:
And who might they be?

Lolita:
They're the authors. They're here to supervise the production.

Humbert:
But you've never acted before.

Lolita:
Oh, they say I have a unique and rare talent.

Humbert:
And how do they know that?

Lolita:
Well, we had readings. I was chosen over thirty other girls.

Humbert:
That's the first I've heard about it.

Lolita:
I know. I wanted to surprise you.

Humbert:
And you suddenly are, overnight, an actress. Well, it's out of the question.

Lolita:
Out of the question?

Humbert:
I don't want you in that atmosphere.

Lolita:
What atmosphere? It's just a school play.

Humbert:
I've told you over and over again. I don't want you mixing with those boys. It's just another excuse to make dates with them, and to get together close with them.

Lolita:
You don't love me.

Humbert:
I do love you.

Lolita:
You don't love me.

Humbert:
I do love you, Lolita.

Lolita:
You're driving me crazy. You won't let me do anything. You just want to keep me locked up with you in this filthy house!...Someday you're going to regret this. You'll be sorry...


Share your thoughts on Lolita's quotes with the community:

0 Comments

    Quote of the Day Today's Quote | Archive

    Would you like us to send you a FREE inspiring quote delivered to your inbox daily?

    Please enter your email address:

    Citation

    Use the citation below to add this movie page to your bibliography:

    Style:MLAChicagoAPA

    "Lolita Quotes." Quotes.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2021. Web. 25 Oct. 2021. <https://www.quotes.net/movies/lolita_quotes_6816>.

    Know another quote from Lolita?

    Don't let people miss on a great quote from the "Lolita" movie - add it here!

    Lolita

    Soundtrack

    »

    Browse Quotes.net

    Quiz

    Are you a quotes master?

    »
    "I'm king of the world!"
    • A. The King's Speech
    • B. King Kong
    • C. Titanic
    • D. The Lion King