Saving Mr. Banks

Saving Mr. Banks is a 2013 period drama film directed by John Lee Hancock from a screenplay written by Kelly Marcel and Sue Smith. Centered on the development of the 1964 film Mary Poppins, the film stars Emma Thompson as author P. L. Travers and Tom Hanks as film producer Walt Disney, with supporting performances by Paul Giamatti, Jason Schwartzman, Bradley Whitford, and Colin Farrell. Deriving its title from the father in Travers' story, Saving Mr. Banks depicts the author's fortnight-long meetings during 1961 in Los Angeles, during which Disney attempts to obtain the screen rights to her novels. Essential Media Entertainment and BBC Films initially developed Saving Mr. Banks as an independent production until 2011, when producer Alison Owen approached Walt Disney Pictures for permission to use copyrighted elements. The film's subject matter piqued Disney's interest, leading the studio to acquire the screenplay and produce the film. Principal photography commenced the following year in September before wrapping in November 2012; the film was shot almost entirely in the Southern California area, primarily at the Walt Disney Studios in Burbank, where a majority of the film's narrative takes place. Saving Mr. Banks premiered at the London Film Festival on October 20, 2013, and was released theatrically that same year in the United Kingdom on November 29 and in the United States on December 13. Upon release, the film received positive reviews, with praise directed towards the acting, screenplay, and musical score. Thompson's performance garnered a BAFTA Award, Golden Globe Award, Screen Actors Guild Award, and Critic's Choice Award nominations for Best Actress, while composer Thomas Newman earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Score. The film itself was named one of the top ten best films of 2013 by the National Board of Review and the American Film Institute, and was also commercially successful, grossing $118 million at the worldwide box office.

Production: Walt Disney Pictures
  Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 13 wins & 72 nominations.
 
IMDB:
7.5
Metacritic:
65
Rotten Tomatoes:
78%
PG-13
Year:
2013
125
$53,260,198
Website
1,302 Views

Walt Disney:
Have you ever been to Kansas City, Mrs. Travers? Do you know Missouri at all?

P.L. Travers:
I can't say I do.

Walt Disney:
Well, it's mighty cold there in the winters. Bitter cold. And my dad, Elias Disney, he owned a newspaper delivery route there. A thousand papers, twice daily; a morning and an evening edition. And dad was a tough businessman. He was a "save a penny any way you can" type of fella, so he wouldn't employ delivery boys. No, no, no... he used me and my big brother Roy. I was eight back then, just eight years old. And, like I said, winters are harsh, and Old Elias, he didn't believe in new shoes until the old ones were worn through. And honestly, Mrs. Travers, the snowdrifts, sometimes they were up over my head and we'd push through that snow like it was molasses. The cold and wet seeping through our clothes and our shoes. Skin peeling from our faces. Sometimes I'd find myself sunk down in the snow, just waking up because I must have passed out or something, I don't know. And then it was time for school and I was too cold and wet to figure out equations and things. And then it was back out in the know again to get home just before dark. Mother would feed us dinner and then it was time to go right back out and do it again for the evening edition. "You'd best be quick there, Walt. You'd better get those newspapers up on that porch and under that storm door. Poppa's gonna lose his temper again and show you the buckle end of his belt, boy."

[Travers looks noticeably unsettled by his story]

Walt Disney:
I don't tell you this to make you sad, Mrs. Travers. I don't. I love my life, I think it's a miracle. And I loved my dad. He was a wonderful man. But rare is the day when I don't think about that eight-year-old boy delivering newspapers in the snow and old Elias Disney with that strap in his fist. And I am just so tired, Mrs. Travers. I'm tired of remembering it *that* way. Aren't you tired, too, Mrs. Travers? Now we all have our sad tales, buy don't you want to finish the story? Let is all go and have a life that isn't dictated by the past? It's not the children she comes to save. It's their father. It's *your* father... Travers Goff.

P.L. Travers:
I don't know what you think you know about me, Walter...

Walt Disney:
You must have loved and admired him a lot to take his name. It's him this is all about, isn't it? All of it, everything. Forgiveness, Mrs. Travers, it's what I learned from your books.

P.L. Travers:
I don't have to forgive my father. He was a wonderful man.

Walt Disney:
No... you need to forgive Helen Goff. Life is a harsh sentence to lay down for yourself.

[last lines]

[the authentic recordings of the rehearsals are being played on tape]

P.L. Travers:
Now, who's reading? And go slowly.

Don DaGradi:
You start and I'll take over.

Robert Sherman:
"Autumn. In the early part of the 20th century, 1910. London. At Number 17 Cherry Tree Lane, the Banks household is in an uproar."

P.L. Travers:
Hold it. Now, I see that Cherry Tree Lane as not too townified on one side of the park. And we'll get you a photograph of 50 Smith Street, in order to see that the house is really quite like that. But it has more of a garden than my house had. But it might be useful and amusing to put it in as my house. You see?

Don DaGradi:
"Upstairs in the nursery, where Mary is measuring up the children with a long row of tape measure, Mary reads off the tape that Jane is..." Well, first she says, "What kind of material have we got to work with?"

P.L. Travers:
No, no. That, we cannot have. That would be quite un-English.

Richard Sherman:
Mrs. Travers, basically what we want to do here is use pretty much what you have in the book.

P.L. Travers:
Yes, yes. Now, I want this tape measure to be used, because it was a tape measure that my mother had when she was a little girl.

Richard Sherman:
Mmm-hmm.

P.L. Travers:
And I think it would be very nice.

Don DaGradi:
"At the end of the chorus..."

P.L. Travers:
Read me all that, now.

Don DaGradi:
We were going to.

P.L. Travers:
Read it. No, no. You read it.

Don DaGradi:
Do you want to bear us? [Chuckles]

P.L. Travers:
No. Go on.

Don DaGradi:
This is torture! [Chuckles]

P.L. Travers:
Now, go on. "At the end of the chorus..." There ought perhaps to have been people in this countryside, you see? Are you making note of it? And they would be the Pearly people. They'd be arriving and they'd come nearer and they'd see, "Ah. Hmm." They know they are not grand enough to eat at this table. Have you got this on tape? Because I think it's important. I'm not going to do this film unless I'm available for it.

Robert Sherman:
Well, there are these tapes also, you know.

P.L. Travers:
No, it's not enough.

Robert Sherman:
We, uh... We have to feel the impact of it.

P.L. Travers:
Yes, yes. Well, anyway, it brings about whatever it is. Mr. Banks, um, is able. He has a tender, good heart, not a change of heart, because he's always been sweet, but worried with the cares of life. [the tape ends]

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